Parents should give kids good sex health education

104 Unity Schools opened today for students of Exiting Classes
August 4, 2020
Presidential Task Force and Teachers express concerns over school resumption
August 4, 2020

Parents should give kids good sex health education

If you are feeling embarrassed talking to your teen about sex education, then take the help of a medical practitioner (pediatrician) or family and relationship therapist. Bottom line is that your children need to understand that you as a parent have created a nurturing environment of trust and truth where they are free to speak about their feelings and seek guidance on how to handle them.

The mention of sex education often evokes a certain sensitivity among parents, to suggest that it is a taboo for discussion. But on the contrary, sex education is not about teaching children how to go out and have sex. According to American Academy of Pediatrics, there is no evidence that sex education will make teenagers more promiscuous. Conversely, sex education delays sexual initiation and helps teenagers make sound decisions. It can also prevent social problems, such as teen pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections (STIs).

Without good sexual health education, teenagers grow up with a substantial number of incorrect ideas about sex and gaps in their understanding of it. Teenagers and young adults learn to be secretive about their feelings and explorations, because they are not free to discuss them with the adults in their lives. They feel guilty about their “normal” thoughts or actions because they are perceived as abnormal. Parents should know that sexual awakening starts anytime pre-adolescence, from 9 to 12 years old. Between the ages of 13 and 16, they have come into adolescence and are heading towards adulthood, during which period they are already thinking about sex, asking questions and needing information on decision-making, social relationships, and sexual customs. If you learn that your child is talking about sex with his or her friends, will you ask that your child suppresses such sexual thoughts? What are you going to do as a parent/guardian? This would be a perfect opportunity to give the child the deserved sex education and guidance!

Read more: All Africa

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *